Catching Up & Strides Walk 2018

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I’ve been away from the blog for a few months. November and December were full of planning, traveling and holidays. January and February have been months of just living and enjoying family. So here’s to catching up in March! Continue reading →

Sunshine and Shadows

I like to share the positives. The triumphs. The laughs. I like the sunshine and light.

Those things are easy to tell. Easy to share and pass along.

This day earlier in January was a triumph of fun even though we had to treat several lows.

It is important, however, to also share our struggles. That is when I hear from others, “I am so glad to know I am not alone.”

It wouldn’t be fair of me to tell you that managing type 1 diabetes is easy. That’s just not true. And we have been incredibly blessed. Even with the technology we have, the access to insulin, insurance, a great medical team, understanding school officials, wonderful teachers, an amazing school nurse and a kind, caring, attentive aide. Even with easy, clear communication between all parties.

This. Is. Hard.

There are countless people dealing with T1D with out consistent access to affordable insulin. Who are fighting insurance, schools, and sometimes even family members who make T1D care more difficult than it already is. There are many people out there without a support network in person or even online like T1D Mod Squad, and Beyond Type 1. Let me tell you, trying to do this stuff alone makes it 10,000 times harder.

Not all days are hard. But there is, even on the easier days, a LOT of work that goes into being a substitute pancreas for a little body.

Grasshopper just had to bring his foam swords along, crosses on his back Ninja Turtle style.

I count the positives. I do. And I celebrate them. But one of the reasons I celebrate them so much is because I know the negatives. Glossing over the pain, the lack of sleep for Grasshopper and us, the mental stress, the worry when he asks us to check on him at night… not talking about that would be to dismiss a huge part of what it is to deal with T1D day in and day out. To be clear, that’s my 6 year old worried about his blood sugar at night. Let that sink in for a bit. That’s a dark mental corner right there. My first grader is asking me to be sure he will make it through the night.

I greet the light with more enthusiasm for having been in the dark.

We have had some fast, scary lows lately. As I write this, while walking on the treadmill because MAMA NEEDS ENDORPHINS, I am also texting with Grasshopper’s team at school. We’ve been dealing with a persistent low all morning. He is eating his snack now. He has a cup of Greek yogurt with 11g carbs and two chocolate Maria cookies at 8g carbs. I’m flipping back and forth from WordPress to his Dexcom graph, willing it to go up. Who needs tv drama when I have Dexcom theater?

Because of my fear, worry, and stress, I try to seek out the bright bits in the dark. Like giggling about telling my 6 year old son to eat his cookies first! Ok, maybe it’s not laugh out loud HA-HA funny, but it tickles me and keeps me going towards the next issue we’ll face.

I know YOU, reading this right now are dealing with your own issues, struggles, worries and fears. They may be quite different than the ones my family faces, or they may be similar. Whatever they are, please know that you can share them, you don’t have to minimize it, and you definitely are not alone.

P.S. Thank goodness his blood sugar is finally coming up!

T1D Car Wash

Friday is car wash day. I vacuumed up at least 20 test strips and ALL the raisins. Dealing with a chronic condition like T1D means the highs and lows happen anywhere, anytime. It doesn’t stop for car washes. Thanks to the noise of the water and then the vacuum I couldn’t hear the Dexcom low alert and for some reason it didn’t show up on my watch. Grasshopper said he felt low. Yep. 55 on the meter, 50 on Dexcom. Continue reading →

Pike Road Lions Strides Walk 2018

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November is Diabetes Awareness Month. Awareness is important. After bringing awareness, I’m interested in ACTION! Continue reading →

Blue November Prep

While I am still getting ready for Halloween, I’m also looking forward to our diabetes awareness efforts for November. We participate in Project Blue November by wearing blue on Fridays and posting on social media. Last year I painted a craft pumpkin with the international symbol for diabetes, a blue circle. We collected all of Grasshopper’s used diabetes supplies and empty packets of Annie’s Fruit Snacks in the pumpkin to show all of the supplies and low blood sugar treatments he used. Continue reading →

Life Speed

By Kay Jacoby

By Erin

Both Alese and I have been busy and we haven’t written much. There have been lots of changes for both of us and it feels like life is moving at light speed. The speed of life. Life speed, full ahead.

I had a moment to slow down a bit after one of Grasshopper’s routine appointments at Children’s Hospital of Alabama. We loved getting to see Heather Jordan to talk about how to better tackle some of the issues we face like helping Grasshopper through the annual blood draws he has to have. The last one was… intense.

After our appointment we were waiting for traffic to ease so we spent some time in Children’s Harbor. I have heard various reactions when we share that we are headed back to Children’s. Fairly often others react with sadness or say some form of, “Oh, that is such a sad place.” Granted, my view of it is due to Grasshopper’s successful diagnosis and treatment there. There certainly are many possible outcomes. For our family Children’s has been and continues to be a place of hope.

I thought I would take some photos to share why Grasshopper is always so excited to go to Children’s Hospital. Continue reading →

20 Minute Poop Storm

In the space of about 20 minutes on Tuesday evening, the following happened:

  • I dosed Grasshopper for a 40 gram weight piece of cinnamon roll for dessert. That is a sliver of a roll, not a whole one. It was a 20 gram carb treat. I sent him to put on his pjs so the insulin could have a little time to work.
  • He walked out a few minutes later holding his insulin infusion site… that was supposed to be attached to his body. I tried to hide my instant anxiety. When did it come off? Did it come off before his 24 gram carb dinner? Did he get any insulin for dinner? Did it come off after dinner but before I dosed for the cinnamon roll slice? Did he get any insulin for that??? Continue reading →