What Happens At Camp Seale Harris Check In?

by Erin Turnham

Registration for 2023 Camp Seale Harris is open as of November 1, 2022! Registration is open for Summer Camps (Day Camps ages 5-15 and Overnight Camps ages 6-18), Family Camps (ages 0-18), and Teen Leadership Forum (grades 9-12). You can view the dates and locations for 2023 programs here. Register your child now at https://csh.campbrainregistration.com/.

The 2022 Camp Seale Harris Junior Camp was Grasshopper’s third overnight summer camp. It would have been his fourth since he started going in 2019, but of course Covid derailed those plans in 2021. We have been going to Camp Seale Harris events since soon after his diagnosis at 21 months old in 2013.

The family weekend camps held at Camp ASCCA in Jackson’s Gap, Alabama helped us become familiar with the facilities. Those weekends together with other Camp Seale Harris family events gave us plenty of time to get to know the people in charge, and to ask lots of questions before Grasshopper was even eligible to go to camp at age 6. By that time our family was as ready as we could be! Even with all that preparation, our first check-in was daunting! I was nervous to leave him, he was ready to stay there and play, and I had heard how long the check-in process was.

To help out other families, I’m sharing what happens during check-in at Camp Seale Harris’ Jackson’s Gap location. Full disclosure, I’m both a parent and a board member. I still stand in the same line as everyone else at check in! This year I took photos as Grasshopper and I went through each station so you can have a first hand look.

Continue reading…

Halloween with T1D

Yes, Grasshopper can and does eat candy. If his blood sugar goes too low he HAS to eat something sugary to bring it back up. Juice, Annie’s Fruit Snacks, Lifesavers Gummies. Sugar can literally save his life.

by Erin

The assumption often is, “Grasshopper can’t eat candy because he has type 1 diabetes.”
The short answer is, “He can and does eat candy. There are times sugar can literally save his life.” The long answer is, “It gets a bit complicated.” Continue reading →

Is Grief Recyclable?

by Erin Turnham

Context: I began writing this on Monday, March 30, 2020. My kids’ last day at school in person was Friday, March 13, 2020. Our school went on Spring Break March 16-20. Due to Covid-19, in-person school wasn’t an option for the rest of the 2019-2020 school year. For the 2020-2021 school year my kids did school virtually. Thanks to the timeless work of grief and the continuing stresses of those two years, this essay still resonates for me. Note: At this time Grasshopper was using the Medtronic 670g and Dexcom. Since that time he has used the Medtronic 770g and Medtronic Guardian sensor and currently uses the T-Slim Tandem with Dexcom G6.

Today my grief is an empty crushed cardboard pizza box. I feel used up, discarded, smashed. Left in the bottom of the can. Greasy, worthless. Littered with crumbs and soggy sauce smears. Where can I leave this grief? How about guilt? Into which bin do I toss my selfishness? I want to throw it all away. I want to be rid of these jagged, used up emotions that tire my mind, and pray that something good can be made out of the clutter. By someone else. I don’t want to do the work of it, I just want to be rid of it all. Grief is work. Sigh.

In the midst of global troubles, my family is trying to manage the daily routines of type 1 diabetes. We had an incident which brought into sharp focus how much work T1D life is.

Continue reading…

Diabetes Awareness Flyer

PDF: Click to download a PDF of the flyer.

JPEG: Screenshot, right click, or tap and save to photos to save this flyer as a JPEG

7 Tips for T1D Cold and Flu

🎶

The Sound of Mucus

Tissues on tables and temperatures rising.

Cold, flu, I don’t know. My wits are capsizing.

Blood sugar battles and ketones they bring.

These are a few of my least favorite things.

By Erin and Alese

Sniff. Cough. Suddenly my kids are velcroed to my side and their foreheads could fry eggs. Sigh. Here we go again. Dealing with sickness and type 1 diabetes at the same time is tricky. From our experiences with T1D since 2013, here are a few of our favorite things that help us when the flu bites, when a cold strikes. Please note that this is not to be taken as medical advice. If you or your child have type 1 diabetes and you are dealing with sickness of any kind, follow your doctor’s guidance. Continue reading →

Shiny Happy Valentines 2020

by Erin

Holidays and parties always bring up questions in the type 1 diabetes community online. Do we send candy? What do we do with candy our children receive? Continue reading →

November 2019 Diabetes Awareness

by Erin Schovel Turnham

I’m excited to host an event in the Alabama River Region for people with type 1 diabetes and their families! This will be a simple get together with yard games on Saturday, November 16 from 9 -11 A.M. in front of Pike Road Elementary School in Pike Road, Alabama.

type1funflyer_2019_11_16.pdf Continue reading →

7 Tips : What To Do When… Your Child Says, “Mama, Look At THAT Kid!”

 

In the foreground a child's finger points to a young boy, blurred, in the background. The boy is crouched on the grass next to a large flowerpot. His posture is slouching and pouty. His arms rest on the flowerpot rim. A toy yellow tractor rests on the grass.

In the foreground a child’s finger points to a young boy, blurred, in the background. The boy crouches on the grass next to a large flowerpot. His posture is slouching and pouty. His arms rest on the flowerpot rim. A toy yellow tractor rests on the grass.

By Erin Schovel Turnham

Nothing quite strikes fear in my heart like my child pointing at another person and saying loudly, “Look, Mama!” Children are naturally curious, and without the social filters we acquire as we age.

A neighbor asked me how to broach the subject with M, her 3 year old daughter. Grasshopper and Sunshine were out playing with M, and Grasshopper had to stop to check his blood sugar. Their friend was obviously curious and while she didn’t ask any questions, her mom wondered how to address it. I was grateful my neighbor reached out. Continue reading →

One Small Step For A Grasshopper

Grasshopper needed some reading practice, so I made a deal with him. If he read a whole book to me, then he could choose another, new book. He loves learning about real people and historical figures especially. The series “Ordinary People Change the World” written by Brad Meltzer and illustrated by Christopher Eliopoulos is in heavy rotation in our house. Continue reading →

Summer Camp Part 7 : Friday

By Erin Schovel Turnham

Friday, June 14, 2019

Home Again

Time to go get my boy from his summer camp adventure! Sunshine and I are ready for the trip. I’ve got my coffee. She has a notebook and crayons. Let’s go! Continue reading →